Abandoned housing in Ireland highlighted on new website

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Dublin is the county in Ireland with the most derelict homes, according to data uploaded to the vacant/derelict property website, Dog House.

The new website was recently founded with the aim of recording and showcasing the growth of derelict and vacant buildings across Ireland. It has a total of 199 locations across the country to date.

The main objective of Dog-House is to “make abandonment visible and to discover opportunities in cities and towns” and “to help initiate the development of abandoned and vacant properties into living spaces”.

Rather than naming and shaming the owners of derelict or vacant buildings, the aim is to showcase properties on offer across the country, in the hopes that a building will catch someone’s eye and it will may express interest in purchasing a property. The idea is that the houses could potentially be sold and salvaged for use.

James McGuaran of dog-house.ie told the Corkman the new website aims to make abandonment visible, as well as giving people the ability to see what’s available in their towns. Speaking to the Corkman, James said: “I don’t think I’ve sold the abandonment crisis with a web app, but I think it will help activists raise awareness.”

The name comes from the informal expression “in the niche” which means “to be in a state of disgrace or disfavor”. Dog-house says: “Much like the housing situation for #GenerationRent in Ireland and around the world.”

There is a huge selection of derelict homes and properties across the country that could be your next home or office. Photo: Dog-House.ie

The main features of the website are to upload images and locations of vacant or derelict properties in your area; register, so that you can browse and indicate your interest in buying a property; and owners can monitor interest in their properties and claim or see which buyers are interested.

Of the 199 derelict buildings uploaded to the website to date, Dublin currently has the most derelict/vacant properties in Ireland, almost half of the total, with 84 properties in Dublin, 15 of which are in the Monkstown area of Dublin, as well as many throughout the city center.

Offaly comes second with a total of 34 properties that appear to be abandoned/vacant. The Portarlington area is very popular with 23 properties marked as derelict housing available for purchase and renovation. Portarlington is also the most popular area in the country with a range of bungalows and residents who were once businesses.

Darragh O'Brien, abandoned dwelling
The Croí Cónaithe fund will see grants of up to €50,000 be awarded by local authorities to support the renovation of vacant and derelict properties, with priority given to applications in areas with high dereliction and vacant housing. Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins Pictures Dublin

County Cork comes third on the list, with 26 establishments currently uploaded to Dog House. Corkman Frank O’Connor, who created the #DerelictIreland hashtag, praised the new website and encouraged the use of “#DerelictIreland” on social media, while also uploading all derelict buildings to DogHouse.

On Thursday, a new government grant of €50 million to help renovate abandoned and vacant homes was made available by the government to tackle abandoned housing in Ireland. The Croí Cónaithe fund will see grants of up to €50,000 be awarded by local authorities to support the renovation of vacant and derelict properties, with priority given to applications in areas with high dereliction and vacant housing.

The program is exclusive to those whose property will be their primary private residence and will not be available to developers. Eligible buildings must have been vacant for at least two years and have been built before 1993.

Housing Minister Darragh O’Brien said: “The Towns of Croí Cónaithe fund is another key step in implementing the government’s plan for housing for all and supporting home ownership.

“This program becomes our latest addition to boost home ownership by helping people renovate vacant properties to become their homes, enabling them to live in cities and towns and remedy vacancy through sustainable reuse.”

To learn more about Dog-House, or start looking for abandoned homes in your area, go to here.

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